Hyundai Eon Overview

It’s not easy to upset Maruti. India’s largest automotive manufacturer however now has cause for a headache and it’s coming from as far south as it gets. In the city of Chennai, Hyundai is busy plotting to inject a big migraine with their new Eon. It’s aimed squarely at the Alto, India’s largest selling car which has been in production for a decade. The Alto monopolised the segment that had only one competitor – the M800 – and despite its global evolution to the A-Star, Maruti decided to retain the Alto brand in India knowing just how successful the car is in their scheme of things. So the Hyundai Eon in India will target both the Alto and the A-Star, not to mention its very own stablemate, the Santro. The ground rules to play in this segment to date were just price and efficiency. Maruti literally wrote all the rules simply because there wasn’t anyone to play against. They were the only kid in a sandbox. So elements like contemporary design, comfort, packaging, performance, dynamics and features were all left to their own devices, no one gave those aspects a second thought. And it’s those areas that Hyundai is tapping into. Time to turn on the Eon. Hyundai Eon  On road price starts from 3,27,218/. Check for price details of Eon in CarzPrice

Hyundai Eon Design & Style

The Eon is the latest recipient of Hyundai’s ‘Fluidic Sculpture’ design language and comes with a level of styling flair not seen before (nor even expected) at the bottom of the car pyramid. Few expensive cars, let alone budget ones, have the eyeball-grabbing appeal of the Eon.The baby Hyundai’s lines are distinctive, though the hexagonal front grille and swept-back headlamps do link it to other models in Hyundai’s range. The triangular fog lights, neatly recessed low down in the bumper, look really attractive. Even the stubby bonnet gets ridges on either side that rise sharply to meet the A pillar. An interesting design element is the front bumper, which flows into the large and stylised front wheel arches.

There is no shortage of style strokes on the sides either. A bold waistline that originates behind the headlights and kinks up to the taillight looks really unique. An arc-shaped line at the bottom of the doors is another of the Eon’s umpteen light-catching details. If there is an area where we feel Hyundai should really have toned down the styling, it’s the wheel arches, which are too pronounced and make the wheels look a tad small. And we’re talking about the top model here, which comes with 13-inch wheels. The 12-inchers on the base models will look positively puny. The rear end has a relatively short overhang and features smart crescent-shaped taillights. Build quality is superb for a car at this end of the spectrum. The tight panel gaps and overall fit and finish point belong to a car in a higher class and the flap-type door handles are the only place where you feel Hyundai has skimped.

Hyundai Eon Cabin & Space

Carrying forward the exemplary justice done to the exterior design, Hyundai has ensured that the Eon’s interiors measure up. Having said that, small cars are a tough task for any manufacturer as their primary role is to keep costs down, and therefore materials used have to fit the bill. The Eon is a little plasticky on the inside, but the execution in terms of sculpting the plastic, its fit and finish and overall visual appeal end up taking market expectations up not just by a notch but to a whole new level.

The fabrics used on the door panels and seat trim are also of a decent quality and customers will find no reason to complain. In terms of space, the Eon manages to offer a decent level on this front as well. Thanks to its ‘tall boy’ stance, the inside offers an element of spaciousness that could best be compared to the likes of the Hyundai i10. Seating is comfortable and four adults can easily fit inside; however five would be a bit of a squeeze. The boot offers enough for a family to pack enough away for a nice weekend getaway and there are a host of storage spaces available within the cabin to tuck away those knick-knacks. Once again, the Eon scores against the Alto in terms of design aesthetics, space and functionality when it comes to the interiors.

Hyundai Eon Engine & Performance

The Hyundai Eon in India gets a 3-cylinder engine that was developed at Hyundai’s R&D centre in Hyderabad. It’s the same engine as in the i10 with one cylinder removed to reduce displacement. It makes 56PS of max power along with 75Nm of torque which is the best in class. Driveability isn’t great with max torque being generated at a fairly high 4000rpm which means you have to constantly shift down to lower gears. In urban areas you will find yourself using second and third gears constantly and that also keeps the revs high.

At engine speeds above 3000rpm it sounds buzzy and scratchy and the sound only dies out considerably when you shift to higher gears and keep the revs low and that largely happens on the highway. Yet its NVH is within comfortable limits and unless revved hard this engine is a quiet operator. It’s also very similar in feel to the Alto’s 800cc engine, in first gear there is a small flat spot under 1500 rpm that intermittently also shows up in second gear. At times unless revved hard it feels like the engine is dying out even though you’ve engaged first gear and released the clutch. The 5-speed transmission is smooth to operate, however on another car it felt notchy. I guess these are some of the consistency issues that Hyundai will have to sort out. The ratios nonetheless are spaced out quite a bit to provide the best fuel efficiency rather than performance, yet first to third gears sees the Eon gain momentum quickly enough.

With a kerb weight of 725kilos the Eon has a decent 77.24PS per tonne though with the tall ratios don’t expect the Eon to make progress very fast. So 100kmph comes up in a lazy 19.08 seconds by which time you are also inching very close to the quarter mile mark, that’s how much distance it covers to get to 100kmph. The quarter mile then takes another eight tenths of a second. With the strong low. and mid range but just noise at the top the Eon feels slow in the roll-ons. Third gear overtaking acceleration is decently fast but shift into fourth or fifth and the 40-100kmph runs feel like an eternity has passed, both runs recording well over 25 seconds. The Eon is quicker than the Alto by a slim margin but at nearly two seconds, a margin it is. That said all of Hyundai’s efforts have been put into fuel efficiency. According to the ARAI figures the Eon returns an overall of 21.1kmpl, on our test cycles however she returned 15.6kmpl in the city and on the highway a brilliant 24.3kmpl but the overall adds up to just 17.75kmpl which is much lesser than what Hyundai claims.

Hyundai Eon Ride & Handling

A light steering makes the Eon well suited to Indian city traffic conditions and a tight turning circle allows cheeky moves through traffic. However, the Eon isn’t fun to drive and the uneven feel the steering offers contributes to this. There’s lots of slack around the straight-ahead position, but when you pile on the lock, the steering suddenly quickens to the point of being over-responsive. This takes some getting used to at higher speeds and the quick turn-in can also catch the novice driver off-guard. Another negative is the lack of sufficient self-centering action, so you have to keep a firm hand on the steering at all speeds.

Straightline stability is adequate and though strong gusts do rock the car, the overall impression is that the Eon is well planted, especially over minor undulations. Low-speed ride quality is another area where it showed a plushness you wouldn’t really associate with a budget city runabout. Yes, it does thump over bumps, but the suspension does a good job of softening the jolt. Over bad roads, the Eon feels out of its comfort zone and the ride isn’t as flat as we would like. There’s a fair amount of vertical movement, owing to its softly sprung setup.Suspension noise is also pretty well contained, though road noise gets intrusive as you go faster. In terms of braking, the Eon offers good feel at the pedal and also doesn’t veer much under panic stops.

Hyundai Eon Braking and Safety

Hyundai has partly taken care of the safety by equipping the vehicle with a single driver side airbag. The reinforced cage of Eon is remarkably strong and has crumple zones to absorb the impact in an event of collision. There are impact beams on the doors of the car, making it pretty safe and strong. Even the floor of the Eon has impact beams to keep the cage safe.There are self-restraining seat belts for the driver and all the passengers. Eon also offers child safety lock on the rear doors, which refrains children from opening the doors from inside the vehicle. The Eon also comes with a remote control security system for convenience. The Eon is pretty loaded on paper, but most of these features come with the top variants only. Otherwise, Eon is a pretty sorted-out vehicle. The top trim also features fog lamps and engine immobilizer, which are not generally seen in this segment. In short, the car is feature rich, but most versions don’t have them!. Check for hyundai car dealers in India @ HyundaiPrice.in 

Hyundai Eon Price

Hyundai Eon Ex-Showroom Price in India ranges from 3,27,218/- (EON D Lite) to 4,56,098/- (EON Magna O Optional). Get best offers for Hyundai Eon from Hyundai Dealers in India

Hyundai Eon Verdict

That the Eon is the entry level hatch to buy is no question about. The interior and exterior styling makes this hatch look stylish and gives it a wide appeal. Because of how it is styled, you’re made to believe you are paying less for it. Interior space while not as good as the Tata Nano, is good enough for four passengers and the feature list for a hatch of its price is good. The engine isn’t as refined as the Alto K10 and neither is the performance as strong as its rival, but it’s good enough to get by and the fuel efficiency is good. Ride quality is one of the Eon’s strength and the handling is good as well. Hyundai has packaged the Eon brilliantly and its swanky appearance makes you believe that you’re buying not a budget hatch but a modern car and therein lies its appeal.

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